The difference between ‘being the leader’ and actually leading

One is based on an assumption, the other is based on an action.

Being the leader is assumed. It’s on your name tag, written in your job description, and comes with the territory. It does not – on it’s own – make people follow you.

‘You know what they call a leader with no followers? Just a guy taking a walk’ (immortal wisdom from Vice President bob in the West Wing).

Actually leading is acting like the leader. It’s earning the right to the name tag, living up to the job description, and owning the territory. It inspires followers.

In churches we can be a fickle bunch, and we don’t often care for our leaders the way we actually should. It’s hard today to meet a Christian who hasn’t got some story of how a leader was abused, or some juicy piece of gossip about how poor a leader was. It’s also hard to meet a leader that hasn’t been back-handed in exactly this kind of way. We don’t make it easy for our leaders!

When a leader starts a new post, they can either become territorial, dictatorial, and then defensive about their shinny new leadership role, or they can grow into it.

How to act like a leader:

1. Take responsibility.
Roll up your sleeves and start working on solutions… including for things within yourself.

2. Don’t enable.
Steer clear of gossip, judgement, and criticising what went before. Challenge those who do.

3. Don’t take sides.
Engage in active conflict resolution and mediation.

4. Pick up the phone.
Rather than leaving problems unanswered get on them immediately and personally.

5. Don’t be afraid of conflict.
Avoiding conflict tends to breed more problematic conflict. Look it in the eye and work at it.

6. Listen activity.
Practice the art of good listening, remembering, and personal critical thinking.

7. Spend time with difficult characters.
Don’t just surround yourself with people you like. Spend intentional time with those you struggle with.

8. Guard your own time.
If you don’t fill your calender, someone else will. Craft your week and stick to it.

9. Guard your contact details.
Give out ways to get in touch with you that you can turn off when necessarily. Not everyone needs your personal number or home address.

10. Say no.
Some ideas are not where things are at, and some times you’re not available. Learn to say no with compassion but finality.

11. Build a team.
Develop a group of core people around you to share responsibility and steer the ship. More on this soon!

12. Take time off – seriously!
ALWAYS guard your time off. Don’t change it.

13. Don’t overstep your resources.
If you can’t resource something (money, people, time, space) then don’t do it.

14. Be sacrificial.
Just like Jesus. Don’t lord it over people, but roll up your sleeves and get stuck in with whatever.

15. Look after your health.
Diet, sleep, and food. A healthy trinity of things you’ll need to function well while leading people.

16. Don’t be afraid of people leaving.
It happens every time leadership changes; for good and bad reasons. Build on what God has given you, and take your time over the foundation.

17. Love what you do.
Take pride and joy in your ministry. Let the best bits fill you, and embrace the bad as learning opportunities. God has called you – so believe in it.

 

Photo by Brooke Lark on Unsplash

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